Tausig Daily Exercises Pdf? Askiver

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Gradus Ad Parnassum: Piano Solo (Schirmer's Library of Musical Classics)

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  • Does anyone know what exercises do famous pianists use? For now I am just going to focus on the Liszt and Tausig exercises and the Kullak octave workbook.

    I have actually tried it and did feel a bit of fatigue but certainly no pain. I did, however, experience pain when switching from my digital piano to an acoustic grand this past month. My wrists/hands have been truly hurting lately from the switch =/...but not from the Tausig exercises.

  • Tausig technical exercises are great, although the first book is merely repetitous of five-finger chromatic exercises and scale exercises. The second book is great because it focuses on more elements. I have not heard of the Pischna or the Phillip. Where can I find them? Please direct me to a sheet music store website with them.

    I am starting a thread to discuss the daily exercise book/routines used by famous pianists known for their technique (Horowitz, Cziffra, Berman, Earl Wild, Lang Lang, Volodos, Matsuev, Hamelin, etc). Does anyone know what daily exercise they do to maintain/strengthen their technique. I currently use the Liszt exercises and sometimes the Tausig daily exercises. Hanon and Czerny seems a bit outdated. Cramer and Clementi are alright. Joseffy's seems too complicated.

    #2418135 - 06/10/12 05:01 PM Re: Tausig Exercise - No Pain No Gain [Re: Jazzwee]
    rick w
    Senior Member

    Registered: 04/15/11
    Posts: 34
    Thanks for posting.

    I learned the exercise more as a theoretical game. I like things that help me "see" the keyboard in different ways.
    The right hand was no problem learning and no pain at all. Not too fast but I kept it legato and with a little work I could build some speed into it.
    OTOH the left hand was a whole other story. The shift to the minor and diminished chords brought quite a bit of pain that didn't build up over time but came almost instantly.
    Couldn't always do legato and was happy just to grab the correct notes.
    I did manage to make it through all twelve keys.
    I didn't like the way the left hand was set up symmetrically (fingering wise, but not note wise) to the right.
    I experimented with playing the left hand with the exact same note pattern as the right.
    Example: starting in C with fingers 5 and 3 on the fifth (C and G) and heading up, rather than fingers 3 and 1 on the fourth (G and C)and heading down.

    This seemed more intuitive to me as someone more interested in watching the chords shift through the keys than beating the hell out of my knuckles.
    If I continue the exercise I will probably do the left hand both ways.

    Top

  • #2418135 - 06/10/12 05:01 PM Re: Tausig Exercise - No Pain No Gain [Re: Jazzwee]
    rick w
    Senior Member

    Registered: 04/15/11
    Posts: 34
    Thanks for posting.

    I learned the exercise more as a theoretical game. I like things that help me "see" the keyboard in different ways.
    The right hand was no problem learning and no pain at all. Not too fast but I kept it legato and with a little work I could build some speed into it.
    OTOH the left hand was a whole other story. The shift to the minor and diminished chords brought quite a bit of pain that didn't build up over time but came almost instantly.
    Couldn't always do legato and was happy just to grab the correct notes.
    I did manage to make it through all twelve keys.
    I didn't like the way the left hand was set up symmetrically (fingering wise, but not note wise) to the right.
    I experimented with playing the left hand with the exact same note pattern as the right.
    Example: starting in C with fingers 5 and 3 on the fifth (C and G) and heading up, rather than fingers 3 and 1 on the fourth (G and C)and heading down.

    This seemed more intuitive to me as someone more interested in watching the chords shift through the keys than beating the hell out of my knuckles.
    If I continue the exercise I will probably do the left hand both ways.

    Top

    A final consideration: Keep in mind that the modern piano has a completely different response than the middle-19th century piano. The action of a modern Steinway is much stiffer and deeper than the action af an ancient Pleyel (I've played a couple). So the Tausig exercise requires much more effort to execute on a modern piano than Tausig himself could have ever imagined.

(Advanced, Level 8+) - Duration: 16:38.