Molecular Exercise Physiology: An ..

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Molecular Exercise Physiology: An Introduction

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  • The focus of the research in the Molecular Exercise Physiology and Muscle Aging lab is on the examination of the role of exercise as an activator of satellite cells in younger and older adults.

    With the Laboratory for Molecular Exercise Physiology now on track, the field of Sports Medicine at Mainz University will increasingly be focusing on aspects of customized diagnostics and treatment. This is a new approach that takes individual personal circumstances into account when it comes to tailoring exercise to the demands of mass and professional sports, and, more particular even, to the stringent requirements of therapeutic applications. To this end, JGU's Sports Medicine and the University Medical Center Mainz are planning close collaboration - starting in projects on colon cancer, autoimmune disorders, and psychological disorders. "Exercise increases levels of free circulating DNA in the blood - a circumstance that may help us for improve diagnostics" explains Professor Simon. The participating researchers hope that they will not only be able to improve the reliability of diagnostic tests for primary disorders, but also to better adapt adjuvant sport and exercise therapy concepts to the needs of individual patients. "Patients respond differently to sport and exercise; in some cases, the outcome is very good. But others do not respond at all or even experience deterioration of their status." The idea is to use molecular diagnostics in order to predict what adjuvant therapy approach is likely to be most beneficial. As it becomes possible to directly account for more and more blood parameters, popular and high-performance sport will be revolutionized: it may even be possible to develop sophisticated analytical techniques that can show whether a further intensification of training will result in improvement of performance or not.

  • Frank C. Mooren, MD, is associate professor at the Institute of Sports Medicine at University Hospital Muenster in Germany, where he leads a molecular exercise physiology research group. Drawing from an academic background in medicine and chemistry, he worked as a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Sytemphysiology in Dortmund. He has also been a consultant in internal medicine and sports medicine at the University Hospital Muenster.

    With the Laboratory for Molecular Exercise Physiology now on track, the field of Sports Medicine at Mainz University will increasingly be focusing on aspects of customized diagnostics and treatment. This is a new approach that takes individual personal circumstances into account when it comes to tailoring exercise to the demands of mass and professional sports, and, more particular even, to the stringent requirements of therapeutic applications. To this end, JGU's Sports Medicine and the University Medical Center Mainz are planning close collaboration - starting in projects on colon cancer, autoimmune disorders, and psychological disorders. "Exercise increases levels of free circulating DNA in the blood - a circumstance that may help us for improve diagnostics" explains Professor Simon. The participating researchers hope that they will not only be able to improve the reliability of diagnostic tests for primary disorders, but also to better adapt adjuvant sport and exercise therapy concepts to the needs of individual patients. "Patients respond differently to sport and exercise; in some cases, the outcome is very good. But others do not respond at all or even experience deterioration of their status." The idea is to use molecular diagnostics in order to predict what adjuvant therapy approach is likely to be most beneficial. As it becomes possible to directly account for more and more blood parameters, popular and high-performance sport will be revolutionized: it may even be possible to develop sophisticated analytical techniques that can show whether a further intensification of training will result in improvement of performance or not.

    Molecular Exercise Physiology: An Introduction
    Henning Wackerhage
    Limited preview - 2014

  • Molecular Exercise Physiology: An Introduction
    Henning Wackerhage
    No preview available - 2014

    You will learn ‘hands on’ molecular exercise physiology techniques that include DNA, RNA and protein extraction, PCR, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The theoretical basis of these techniques will be explained and their use in research papers analysed.

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Structured around central themes in sport and exercise science, such as nutrition, endurance training, resistance training, exercise & chronic disease and ageing, this book is the perfect foundation around which to build a complete upper-level undergraduate or postgraduate course on molecular exercise physiology.