McKenzie exercises for the shoulder

14. Lateral Cervical McKenzie Exercises

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  • The fifth and final stage of McKenzie's exercises for lower back pain is standing spinal extensions. Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your hands on your lower back. From this position lift your chest and lean back. Hold this position for 20 to 30 seconds before relaxing and repeating. This movement is an effective stand-alone exercise if you have been sitting for a long period of time and do not have space or time to complete the full McKenzie exercise series.

    If your lower back pain is chronic you will benefit from performing McKenzie’s series of exercises two, three or even more times a day. Morning, noon and night is a good schedule to ensure that you perform the exercises often enough for them to be beneficial. Once your back pain is under control, you may find that performing the exercises once a day is sufficient to stop the pain from returning. If you spend an especially long time sitting down, increase the frequency of your McKenzie exercises to stop your back pain returning.

  • Study design: A single blinded, randomized control trial, pretest-posttest design, with 6 week treatment programme. Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of Mckenzie exercises to that of a mat based Pilates exercise in improving the pain, functional disability and trunk ROM associated with CNLBP (Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain).Background: Therapeutic approaches developed by Mckenzie and Pilates are becoming popular; however, there have been no reports on their difference effectiveness. Methods and measure: Thirty physically active subjects between 20 and 65 years old with CNLBP were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. McKenzie exercise group (MEG) received McKenzie exercises for 6 weeks based on the assessment; while the Mat based pilates exercise (MBPE) group received Pilates exercise for the same 6 weeks duration. The outcome measures of pain are measured by the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), functional disability is measured using a Rolland Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ) and the trunk ROM is measured using modified Schobers method. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data. The results: No statistical difference existed on posttest comparisons were made on outcome data between groups on pain (pConclusion: The results may help physiotherapists in clinical decision-making. Between group comparisons of changes in the dependent variable scores revealed no statistical differences between the groups.

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of stabilization and McKenzie exercises on pain, disability, and thickness of the transverse abdominis and multifidus muscles in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. Thirty patients were separated at random into two groups: the McKenzie and stabilization exercise groups. Prior to and following intervention, pain, disability, and thickness of the transverse abdominis and multifidus muscles were evaluated by visual analogue scale, functional rating index, and sonography, respectively. The training program was 18 scheduled sessions of individual training for both groups. Following interventions, the pain score decreased in both groups. The disability score decreased only in the stabilization group. The thickness of the left multifidus was significantly increased during resting and contracting states in the stabilization group. The thickness of the right transverse abdominis during the abdominal draw-in maneuver, and thickness of the left transverse abdominis during the active straight leg raising maneuver were significantly increased in the stabilization group. The intensity of pain, disability score, thickness of the right transverse abdominis during the abdominal draw-in manouver, and thickness of the left transverse abdominis during active straight leg raising in the stabilization group were greater than those on the Mackenzie.

    Table 6. Mean, SD and within Group Changes Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test (Mckenzie Exercise Group)Group (statistical significance at P<0.05)>
         

  • Table 6. Mean, SD and within Group Changes Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test (Mckenzie Exercise Group)Group (statistical significance at P<0.05)>
         

    If your lower back pain is chronic you will benefit from performing McKenzie’s series of exercises two, three or even more times a day. Morning, noon and night is a good schedule to ensure that you perform the exercises often enough for them to be beneficial. Once your back pain is under control, you may find that performing the exercises once a day is sufficient to stop the pain from returning. If you spend an especially long time sitting down, increase the frequency of your McKenzie exercises to stop your back pain returning.

McKenzie Exercises - Cervical / Thoracic.

The way that the McKenzie exercises work are by using specific movements that correctly position the lumbar spine to move the bulging disc away from the nerve that it is pushing on. Basically what is happening is that you are moving the bulging disc back into its normal position in the spine. This action with help alleviate pain and allow improved spinal mobility.